RTLE

Roads to
Learning and Earning


Guide for Teachers

go for a SPIN (Strengths, Preferences, Interests, Needs)
Objectives, activities, and resources that guide teachers in formal and informal transition assessments with students and families to reflect individualized goals during and after school

Objectives and Activities to Begin in Middle School

Objectives and Activities to Begin in High School

Objective

Complete informal and formal transition assessments or questionnaires with students and families to gather strengths, preferences, interests, and needs in order to write individualized transition goals.

Activities

Informal assessments are located in one of these three Transition Series

PRO-ED Employment and Career Planning pgs. 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 21, 25, 29, 41, 43, 45, 60, 61, 94, 106, 118, 122

Employment Assessment (at least 2):
  • What's Important to You?
  • The Big Picture About Interests
  • Moving On To Your Future
  • Needs Fit
  • Typical Job Interview Questions
  • Skills You Are Good At
  • My Future
  • Identifying What Is Important to Me
  • My Career Plan
  • Deciding on a Volunteer Experience
  • Skills Identification
  • Life Career Major Survey
  • Careers in My Family
  • Consumer Guide to Transition Planning
  • Job Readiness Checklist
  • Interest Survey
  • Reach for the Stars
PRO-ED Postsecondary Education and Training pgs. 11, 15, 16, 19, 20, 29, 34, 47, 49, 50, 51, 60, 65, 71, 72, 86

Post-secondary Training/Education (at least 2):
  • Transition Calendar from High School
  • Study-Skills Checklist
  • Thinking About Education and Training Options
  • Consumer Guide to Transition Planning
  • What Are My Goals
  • My Postsecondary Plans
  • Before-Going-to-college Checklist
  • Understanding My Disability
  • Study-Skills Questionnaire
  • Why Am I Going to College?
  • Planning After College
  • Learning-Related Preferences
  • My Learning and Living Strengths
  • Training-in-the Military Checklist
  • Exploring Military Training
  • My Challenges
  • College Information
  • Learning Support Services and Programs
PRO-ED Independent Living and Community Participation pgs. 17, 19, 21, 23, 24, 35, 69, 70, 76, 78, 79, 103, 113
  • Activity for Adult Outcomes in the Community
  • Me and My Future
  • I Am
  • Hobby and Interest Inventory
  • Values That Are Important to Me
  • Self-Esteem Profile
  • Things I Would Like to See in My Transition Plan
  • Money
  • Daily Living Skills Competency Rating
  • Home Living
  • Living on My Own
  • Money Management
  • Social Skills
  • Student Transition Summary
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Driver's Seat
Objectives, activities, and resources focused on what teachers, families, and students can do to take charge of future goals and make appropriate plans during and after high school

Objectives and Activities to Begin in Middle School

Objective

Using explicit teaching strategies or technology (as needed), have students invite their support teams and lead their IEP meetings.

Activities

  • Invite your students to the IEP meeting
  • If the student does not attend the transition IEP meeting, document other steps taken to ensure that the student's needs, preferences, and interests were considered
  • Explicitly teach students how to lead their IEP meetings and talk about goals

Objective

With support from families, teach students about their strengths and weaknesses and how to request help or talk through decisions in and out of the classroom environment.

Activities

  • Help your students advocate for themselves
  • Teach your students about their strengths and weaknesses
  • Have students make decisions they are capable of handling
  • Provide opportunities to make choices and decisions, to explore and take risks, and to learn from experiences of success and failure
  • Teach students how to self-regulate and self-manage day to day actions

Objectives and Activities to Begin in High School

Objective

Develop and monitor transition goals to be sure they are individualized and include long term employment, education, and independent living options that students can achieve during and after high school.

Activities

  • Teach students to break long term goals into short term objectives
  • Make a long-term plan with your students for school, work, and living in your community
  • Work with students to identify their plans/goals for what they will do after they graduate
  • Look at IEP goals to make sure they are relevant to life after high school
  • Document how the student will exit school
  • Review and revise if needed how students will exit school

Objective

Guide families to adult resources needed for establishing long term medical needs, financial planning, guardianship, voting, and photo IDs.

Activities

  • Think about the programs and support needed when the student leaves school
  • Provide resources to families for a doctor and a dentist
  • Facilitate going or working with families to get students an identification card
  • Understand financial planning needed for Social Security Income and special needs trust
  • Teach students about Miranda rights
  • Know details about guardianship to educate families including options for full guardianship
  • Register men for Selective Service

Objective

Using explicit teaching strategies or technology (as needed), have students invite their support teams, lead their IEP meetings, and update their Summary of Performance (SOP).

Activities

  • Invite your students to the IEP meeting
  • If the student does not attend the transition IEP meeting, document other steps taken to ensure that the student's needs, preferences, and interests were considered
  • Explicitly teach students how to lead their IEP meetings and talk about goals
  • Be sure the IEP promotes independence
  • Teach students to develop and annually update the Summary of Performance (SOP) by using the transition assessment results

Objective

Using role play and explicit teaching methods, provide opportunities for practicing appropriate social skills and decision making.

Activities

  • Provide opportunities to make choices and decisions, to explore and take risks, and to learn from experiences of success and failure
  • Teach appropriate behavior in social situations using role play, videos, and discussion
  • Provide resources to students and families so they can help create daily schedules
  • Teach students how to self-regulate and self-manage day to day actions

Objective

With support from families, teach students about their disability and how to request help or talk through decisions in and out of the classroom environment.

Activities

  • Best practices should include real choice, true inclusion, and high expectations for your students
  • Teach your students about their disability needs
  • Help your students advocate for themselves
  • Be sure you allow student voice about personal desires rather than bending to anyone else's desires
  • Talk to your students about their strengths and needs for work and school
  • Have students make decisions they are capable of handling
  • Find specific ways for students to regularly participate in school wide programs and community activities
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Road to Work
Objectives, activities, and resources that teachers, families, and students can work on together to plan for successful employment after school.

Objectives and Activities to Begin in Middle School

Objectives and Activities to Begin in High School

Objective

Based on student interests and job skills, have students apply or practice skills to get a job such as writing resumes, filling out job applications, interviews.

Activities

  • Help students create a resume, job portfolio, and/or video resume
  • Teach the student job interviewing skills and provide opportunities for the students to practice those skills
  • Provide students opportunities to go to job fairs to explore jobs and careers
  • Work with Vocational Rehabilitation to help students seek competitive employment options
  • Help students search and apply for summer jobs in the community

Objective

Teach students work skills and ways to evaluate their own work performance in relevant job placements

Activities

  • Regularly evaluate the curriculum to ensure that you are teaching skills that employers need
  • Provide work experiences during school hours to teach work skills
  • Provide guidance to families and students about necessary documents needed for employment (birth certificate, social security card, tax forms)
  • Help your students get a real paid job in the community
  • Teach students about job accommodations and how to ask for them at work
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Road to College
Objectives, activities, and resources that teachers, families, and students can work on together in order to prepare for college.

Objectives and Activities to Begin in Middle School

Objectives and Activities to Begin in High School

Objective

Continue to explore college options with students and families through internet, visits to college campuses, and transition fairs.

Activities

  • Do website searches with students and look for employment, vocational training, colleges, and postsecondary schools to learn about course requirements, potential majors, costs, services for students with disabilities, living arrangements, activities, and student life
  • Provide resources on postsecondary accommodations and supports to student and families
  • Take students to college fairs and/or tour a college/university
  • Encourage families and students to get involved in volunteer and community activities for increasing their chances of being accepted into college programs

Objective

Using resources provided, explain the distinct differences between high school and college to students and families.

Activities

  • Teach students and families how college and high school services are different with a visit to Disability Services at a local college
  • Provide documentation students need for college (recent psychological assessment, letters of reference, summary of performance)
  • Collaborate with school guidance counselors on financial aid and college opportunities
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Road to Community Living
Objectives, activities, and resources for teachers, families, and students that work towards successful independent living options after high school

Objectives and Activities to Begin in Middle School

Objectives and Activities to Begin in High School

Objective

Provide students and families with skills needed for navigating and safely living as independently as possible in the community.

Activities

  • Teach and provide resources on sexuality and family planning
  • Teach students to assume responsibility for health care needs, such as making appointments, and filling and taking prescriptions
  • Provide resources for driver's education and local transportation systems in the community
  • Begin to prepare and practice a transportation plan after high school

Objective

With support from community agencies, provide families and students with housing, financial, and community mapping resources needed for achieving their goals in the community.

Activities

  • Educate and provide resources to families and students about voting
  • Perform community mapping to identify the postsecondary education, vocational, residential, and recreational opportunities available to students within their community
  • Work with the student to start thinking about how they are going to pay for their own living on a fixed income
  • Provide information to the student and family concerning the residential placements in the state
  • Provide resources to families on Section 8 Housing Vouchers
  • Discuss with students the kinds of insurance that they may receive after high school
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